Events and Classes

April 26, 2013 - Friday Institutes

8th Annual Pittsburgh Conference on Child Maltreatment

8:30 a.m. – 9:30  p.m.

Keynote Address

Opening Up About Child Sex Abuse
Presenter:
Al Chesley, National Football League, (retired)

Al Chesley is many things: a former NFL linebacker with the Philadelphia Eagles and the Chicago Bears; an accomplished professional; public speaker; advocate; and a survivor of childhood sexual abuse. But, at 50 years old, Mr. Chesley is still growing. Mr. Chesley survived sexual abuse as a young teenager and only in the past few years has been able to open up about it and transform this experience into a powerful force for change. This presentation will shed light on the profound impacts of childhood sexual abuse, what can make a difference in the lives of survivors, and an inspirational message for victims and all those working to reach and support other child sexual abuse victims.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. learn about Mr. Chesley's personal story of abuse and survival.
  2. understand how sexual assault affects people of all walks of life.
  3. get some helpful information on speaking to other young men, and adult males on speaking out about their abuse.

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9:45 a.m. – 3:45  p.m.

K. Out of Secrecy...

The Best Kept Secret: Mother-Daughter Sexual Abuse
Presenter:
Julie Brand, MS, CAPER Consulting

This workshop describes the complex mother-daughter incestuous relationship—the subtle, yet intentional violations of normal mother-child boundaries, covert and overt abuse and the psychological manipulations used to silence victims. Attendees will learn ways to include mothers as potential perpetrators in prevention programs and in sexual abuse investigations. Six key therapeutic issues for recovery will be discussed. The program concludes with a discussion of both the shared dynamics and the differences between mother-daughter and mother-son incest. The presenter is both an experienced counselor and a resilient survivor of maternal sexual abuse.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. describe three interpersonal characteristics of the incestuous mother-daughter relationship.
  2. list two ways to include mothers as the potential perpetrators in prevention programs and also during sexual abuse investigations.
  3. identify four therapeutic issues critical to victims’ recovery from mother-daughter or mother-son sexual abuse.

AND

Resiliency 101: From Victim to Survivor
Presenter:
Julie Brand, MS, CAPER Consulting

Some victims of childhood abuse perpetuate the cycle; others grow to be safe, nurturing adults. How can we influence which path they will choose? This workshop identifies seven key steps to becoming a resilient survivor—steps that can help a victim to overcome trauma and to develop a “survivor’s perspective.” Attendees will learn how to use the “language of resiliency” to identify and reinforce victims’ strengths, positively impacting their self-perceptions. This workshop offers an inspiring and doable strategy for working with victims of trauma.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. describe three key steps that can help victims become survivors.
  2. explain how both awareness and empathy are necessary for the transition from victim to survivor.
  3. give two examples that show how to use the “language of resiliency” with victims.

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L. Serving Diverse Populations

Sexual Minority Youth “In the System”: Challenges and Opportunities
Presenter: Liz Winter, PhD, LSW, Academic Coordinator and Clinical Assistant Professor, Child Welfare Education for Leadership Program, School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh

This session will describe the increased risks faced by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, and Questioning (LGBTQ) children and youth, which in turn increase the likelihood of becoming involved in the child welfare and other systems. Several key elements of appropriate service provision will be presented which address problems frequently described by LGBTQ youth receiving services. Resources for professional development and service improvement will be presented, together with ways to locate community supports for families.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. be able to describe increased risks faced by LGBTQ children and youth.
  2. be able to identify 3 elements of appropriate servie provision for LGBTQ children and youth.
  3. be able to locate at least 3 resources for further information.

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Working with Immigrant Children and Families: Bridging the Gap in Language and Culture
Facilitator: Barbara Murock, Health Policy Specialist/Immigrants and Internationals Initiative Manager, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

Presenter
Samaria Arzola, Site Director for the Latino Family Center
Leslie Aizenman, Director of Refugee Services at Jewish Family & Children’s Services
Susan Kalson, CEO of the Squirrel Hill Health Center
Mary Carrasco, Director of International and Community Health at the Pittsburgh Mercy Health System

This session will include presentations by professionals who work daily with immigrants and refugees in the Western Pennsylvania area as well as representatives of immigrant communities. Topics to be addressed include: Who are the immigrants in the greater Pittsburgh area. What are the challenges facing vulnerable families as they navigate differences in language, culture and expectations in raising children regarding healthcare, hygiene, safety, school attendance/achievement, discipline and family roles. What are common issues leading to involvement in the child protection system and how do cultural differences heighten the trauma of involvement in the child protection system. What role do refugee resettlement agencies, immigrant service providers and family support centers play helping to bridge this language and culture gap, and supporting prevention and treatment. How can service providers and child welfare providers and courts work more collaboratively to assure positive outcomes for families? What prevention and support programs and resources are available to build on the strengths of at-risk immigrant families that healthcare providers should know about?

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. develop a better understanding of immigrant families in our region and some of their life experiences and common issues they are facing.
  2. learn from recent experience of service providers supporting families involved in the child protective system about ways the system can function effectively.
  3. gain an enriched perspective on the traumatic transition to American child rearing expectations for immigrant families, how this lack of understanding may put children at risk and how we can work to educate ourselves and the families with clearer expectations.
  4. learn ways that professionals involved in roles can collaborate in helping vulnerable immigrant families.
  5. gain knowledge of available resources to understand and effectively serve immigrant children, youth and families.

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M. Early and Often: Expanding the Avenues For the Prevention Message
Sponsored by PA Chapter - American Academy of Pediatrics and Prevent Child Abuse America - PA

Part 1: Extreme Upstream – Going Backwards to Move Forward on Prevention
Presenters
Elizabeth Miller, MD, PhD, Chief, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh
Teresa Olsen, MEd, Director, Child Abuse and Neglect Program, PA Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics

We know that child abuse and neglect impacts brain development and that Adverse Childhood Experiences (from the ACE Study) can lead to physical and mental health problems and risky behaviors which can result in early death. So, what are the factors that most contribute to child abuse and neglect? Poverty is associated with many of the ACE study variables and the highest risk for living in poverty is being a single mother or being the child of a single mother. If we really want to stop kids from being dropped in the water of abuse/neglect/dependency, we need to travel upstream to tackle the significant problem of unintended/unplanned pregnancy.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. identify the direct correlation between single mothers and poor outcomes for children.
  2. learn what is being done to help adolescents take charge of reproductive health.
  3. strategize what can be done on a community level.

Part 2: Cultural Shift Successes in International Movement to Protect Children from Abuse and Neglect; Bringing Lessons Back to Pennsylvania
Presenter: Patricia Sprague, MS, Executive Director, Prevent Child Abuse Pennsylvania, a program of the American Academy of Pediatrics - PC Chapter

Overview of obstacles and taboos overcome and the genesis of a new child rights movement. The trajectory from seemingly insurmountable odds to extraordinary strength and courage -- bringing child abuse and neglect out of the shadows and into the public domain in the Arab world. As Mahatma Ghandhi said, "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." Bringing back lessons learned to Pennsylvania.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. learn some of the obstacles faced in a social reform movement and how they were successfully addressed.
  2. learn how teens were incorporated in giving voice and - unquestionable authenticity - to urgent needs of child abuse and neglect prevention.
  3. glean some idea for working through substantial barriers.

Part 3: Strengthening Families Protective Factors Framework
Presenter: Gerald (Jerry) Crispino, Jr, Family Support Technical Assistance Coordinator Center for Schools and Communities

Families thrive when protective factors are robust in their lives and communities. In this workshop, participants will learn about the five protective factors that build family strengths and a family environment that promotes optimal child and youth development.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. understand the five research-based protective factors that keep families strong.
  2. learn practical strategies to build protective factors in families.
  3. apply the use of the protective factors in their role as resource parents or as agency staff working with families.

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N. Safely Putting the Information Super Highway to Work for Nonprofits

Part 1: Workflow Efficiency: Collaboration in the Cloud
Presenter: Ryan Mitchell, Annie Bontempo, E. Louise Larson, Will True
HandsOn Tech VISTAs at Pittsburgh Cares

Workflow Efficiency will focus on the idea of technology “ecosystems” to increase productivity. The AmeriCorps VISTA HandsOn Tech program was created to help nonprofits that strive to reduce poverty develop sustainable technology practices. This includes implementing better technology tools, helping nonprofits create realistic technology maintenance plans, and leading informational and best-practices trainings. HandsOn Tech presenters will describe several cloud-based management systems, such as Google Apps, Microsoft 365, Apple’s iWork/iCloud, and Amazon Cloud. Lastly, this workshop will present best-practices for developing IT Management strategies and guidelines for nonprofits.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. learn about the benefits of working in the cloud.
  2. learn how tech ecosystems can streamline collaboration and increase efficiency.
  3. learn how to effectively translate technology into activity.

Part 2: TECH Smart for Kids
Presenter: Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh TECH Smart Trainers

Allowing kids to go online without supervision or ground rules is like allowing them to explore a major city by themselves. The Internet, like a city, offers an enormous array of resources but also presents potential risks. Learn to set guidelines to allow kids to explore the net while protecting their privacy and keeping them safe.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. learn Internet basics.
  2. learn about risks on the Internet by exploring the programs used by children.
  3. learn what to do once risk are identified and how to address those risks.

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O. Building Healthy Communities: Innovations and New Initiatives

Part 1: Coaching Boys into Men: An Evidence-Based Dating Violence Prevention Program
Presenter: Maria Catrina Virata, MPH, CPH, Clinical Research Coordinator, Administrator III, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Despite the high prevalence of intimate partner violence reported among adolescent females, effective prevention programs specifically focused on shifting gender norms and attitudes among adolescent males are limited. This presentation will showcase Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM), a comprehensive and evidence-based violence prevention program that engages athletic coaches and young athletes to stop violence against women and girls. The CBIM program consist of strategies, scenarios, and resources needed to talk to boys, specifically, about healthy and respectful relationships, dating violence, sexual assault, and harassment.

CBIM underwent an extensive three-year randomized-controlled trial in Sacramento, California through funds provided by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). This research was conducted with sixteen high schools and over 2,000 athletes. Results demonstrated male athletes who receive the program had increased intentions to intervene and positive bystander behavior. Furthermore, 12 month follow up data also shows a reduction in abuse perpetration. These findings support the effectiveness of CBIM as a school athletic-based approach to prevent dating violence among teens.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. describe previous research evaluating CBIM as an evidence-based program effective in preventing violence against women and girls.
  2. provide information on using the CBIM toolkit and strategies in engaging and training coaches to deliver the program.
  3. explain best practices for implementing the CBIM program through collaboration with local domestic violence agency, coaches, school staff and administration.

Part 2: Building Healthy Communities from a Crisis Nursery Nidus
Presenters
Lynne L. Williams, MD, PhD, Co-Founder of Jeremiah’s Place – Pittsburgh Relief Nursery
Tammy J. Murdock, MD, Co-Founder of Jeremiah’s Place – Pittsburgh Relief Nursery

Despite years of prevention work and the existence of numerous human services and non-profit organizations, the occurrence of child abuse remains relatively unchanged. In this presentation, we would like to consider emerging principles for primary prevention of child maltreatment by integrating what is known from various disciplines. Using a crisis nursery model as a nidus for the germination of ideas and information, we seek to create an organization that will support and maintain families, and thereby build stronger, healthier communities.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. illustrate key steps towards building healthy communities.
  2. demonstrate how the constructs of Adverse Childhood Experiences and Toxic Stress lead to an integration of academic and service-oriented disciplines.
  3. examine the model of a crisis (or relief) nursery in impacting the prevention of child maltreatment.

Part 3: Dancing Classrooms: An Innovative Prevention Program
Presenters
Mark Rogalsky, MSW, Unit Manager-Prevention Services, Pittsburgh Mercy Health System
Terry and Rozana Sweeney, Teaching Artists-Dancing Classrooms Pittsburgh, Co-owners of Art and Style Dance Studio

Dancing Classrooms is a unique prevention/intervention strategy targeting youth, designed to increase protective and reduce risk factors associated with substance use and behavioral health. Specially trained dance instructors/prevention specialists utilize ballroom dancing as the medium to increase academic motivation, self-esteem, civility and cooperation, as part of the regular school curriculum. This non-traditional approach relies on the engagement of students, teachers, school officials, parents and community for overall success. Quantitative and Qualitative data will be presented as well as the opportunity to do a little dancing.

Objectives
Participants will:

  1. develop greater awareness of the utilization of the non- traditional approach of ball room dancing as a mechanism to increase protective factors and reduce risk for youth, living in high risk communities, transitioning to middle school (5th grade).
  2. increase knowledge of community engagement strategies and non-traditional Prevention Partnerships designed to facilitate program success.
  3. gain a greater understanding of innovative approaches that impact cultural centricity and encourage appreciation of difference, civility and respect.

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Last Update
March 17, 2013
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Last Update
March 17, 2013
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