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Docusate (Colace®)

Uses

Docusate (Colace®) is a medication used to treat and prevent constipation (dry or hard stools) in children who have undergone intestinal transplantation. It works by incorporating water and fat into your stool.

People taking this medication usually feel relief one to two days after the first dose, but three or four days may pass before docusate is effective. Notify your transplant coordinator if your child has not had a bowel movement for five days, or if your child develops diarrhea.

To prevent constipation, your child should drink plenty of fluids, eat foods with fiber, and exercise regularly.

Types Available

Docusate is taken by mouth and is available as a liquid and as tablets and capsules (in 100-mg doses and other amounts).

How to Take

Docusate can be taken with or without food. If your child is taking this medication, he or she should get plenty of fluids. This will increase the effectiveness of docusate.

Missed Doses

If your child misses a dose of docusate, take it as soon as you or your child remembers. If you remember within two hours of the next scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and resume your child’s usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Side Effects

While taking docusate, your child may have abdominal pain or stomach discomfort that ranges from cramps or aches to nausea and vomiting.

In rare cases, people taking docusate experience:

  • skin rash
  • rectal bleeding
  • dehydration
  • muscle cramps, muscle weakness or dizziness (These symptoms suggest loss of essential nutrients.)

If any of these side effects continues or becomes bothersome, inform your child's doctor or transplant coordinator.

Drug Interactions

Tell your doctor or pharmacist about any prescription or over-the-counter medication your child is taking, so that you can be warned of undesirable interactions and prevent them.

Precautions

Using docusate for a long time may cause the loss of normal bowel function or laxative dependence.

Drug information changes periodically. For the most updated information on drugs, visit www.drugs.com.

Learn more about other Intestine Transplant Drugs.

Last Update
November 23, 2010
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Last Update
November 23, 2010
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