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Nifedipine (Procardia XL®, Adalat CC®)

Uses

Nifedipine (Procardia XL®, Adalat CC®) is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension) in children who have undergone intestine transplantation.

Action

Nifedipine is a calcium-channel blocker. It blocks the movement of calcium into the heart muscle and blood vessels. As a result, the heart muscle relaxes and blood vessels open (dilate), lowering blood pressure.

Types Available

Nifedipine is usually taken by mouth. It is available as capsules and tablets. Procardia XL® and Adalat CC® are extended-release tablets that available in 30-, 60-, and 90-mg doses.

How to Take

Nifedipine can be taken with or without food. Your child should swallow the tablet whole without chewing, breaking or crushing it. Avoid drinking grapefruit juice one hour before or two hours after taking nifedipine.

Missed Doses

If your child misses a dose, take it as soon as you or your child remembers. If the time is within two hours of the next scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and resume your child’s usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Side Effects

Common side effects that may occur but should disappear as your child’s body adjusts to the medication include:

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness (especially during the first few days). Getting up slowly helps minimize dizziness.
  • bloating
  • heartburn
  • nausea
  • blurred vision
  • muscle cramps
  • weakness
  • headache
  • flushing
  • sweating
  • sleep disturbances

Rare side effects include:

  • breathing difficulties
  • swelling of the hands or feet
  • chest pain or irregular heartbeat
  • tender bleeding or swollen gums
  • shortness of breath
  • constipation

If your child has trouble with any of these, inform your doctor or transplant coordinator.

Note: The empty tablet shell may appear in your child’s stool. Do not be concerned; the medication has already been absorbed into his or her body.

Drug Interactions

Tell your transplant coordinator and/or pharmacist about any other prescription or over-the-counter medications your child is taking, so you can be warned of undesirable interactions and prevent them.

Drug information changes periodically. For the most updated information on drugs, visit www.drugs.com.

Learn more about other Intestine Transplant Drugs.

Last Update
November 22, 2010
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Last Update
November 22, 2010
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