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Nystatin (Mycostatin®, Nilstat®)

Uses

Nystatin (Mycostatin®, Nilstat®) is an antifungal medication used to prevent or treat fungal infections of the mouth in children who have undergone liver transplantation.

Types Available

In children, nystatin is normally administered by mouth (as a liquid suspension, as tablets, or as lozenges), or the skin (through the use of a cream, powder, or ointment).

How to Take

If your child is using the oral suspension, shake the bottle well before pouring your dose. Your child should place half the total dose on one side of his or her mouth, and the remaining half on the other side. Next, your child should swish the suspension around his or her entire mouth, keeping the liquid inside as long as possible before swallowing. (Before swallowing, your child may also gargle.)

Nystatin should be taken with food and after other medications. Do not eat or drink anything for 30 minutes after taking nystatin.

Missed Doses

If your child misses a dose, it should be taken as soon as you or your child remembers. If it is within two hours of the time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your child’s usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Side Effects

In rare cases, some children taking nystatin experience abdominal pain, gas or diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. If your child has trouble with any of these effects, talk with your transplant doctor or transplant coordinator. Often, these side effects resolve as your child’s body adjusts to the medication.

Drug Interactions

Tell your doctor or pharmacist about any prescription or over-the-counter medications your child is taking, so you can be warned of interactions and prevent them.

Storage

Store at room temperature. Do not store frozen.

Availability

Most pharmacies stock nystatin, but call your pharmacist at least five business days before you need to fill a nystatin prescription, to make sure the medication will be available.

Drug information changes periodically. For the most updated information on drugs, visit www.drugs.com.

Learn more about other Liver Transplant Drugs.

Last Update
November 20, 2010
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Last Update
November 20, 2010
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