Stars 4.2 55 Patients Satisfaction Reviews 6 comments
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Specialty:

Pediatrics
Neurology

Secondary Specialty:

Neurology (pediatric)

Board Certifications:

Epilepsy, Neurology with Special Qualification in Child Neurology

Education:

Dow Medical College
Karachi, Sindh,

Residency:

Mount Sinai Hospital - Chicago
Chicago, IL
University of Pittsburgh Medical School
Pittsburgh, PA
University of Pittsburgh Medical School
Pittsburgh, PA

Fellowships:

University of Pittsburgh Medical School
Pittsburgh, PA

Affiliations:

Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC
UPMC Northwest
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC
UPMC Hamot

Languages:

Urdu

Bilal Sitwat, MD

Doctor

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Locations and Directions

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Biography

Research Interests

  • A 12-Month Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of Pregabalin as Adjunctive Therapy in Pediatric patients 1 Month to 16 Years of Age with Partial Onset Seizures
  • Refractory Status Epilepticus in Children: Retrospective Review
  • Effectiveness of Bumetanide in Refractory Status Epilepticus in Children
  • Is Levetiracetam Effective in Treatment of the Electrical Status Epilepticus during Slow Wave Sleep (ESES)?
  • Topiramate and Zonisamide: Do These Cause Oligohydrosis as well as Alter Sweat Electrolyte Concentrations

Biography Summary

Dr. Sitwat specializes in treating difficult to control seizures in children with epilepsy. He sees patients with all types of neurological issues. His clinic sites include main campus at Children's Hospital, Specialty Care Centers in Hermitage and Wheeling, Children’s Wexford office and Children’s South office. He is actively involved in Epilepsy Surgery Program. He is the director of ‘Refractory Seizures Clinic’ at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and is the specialty medical consultant for the Epilepsy Foundation of Western Pennsylvania (EFWPA)

Patient Comments

Patient comments are gathered from our Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey and are displayed in their entirety. Patients are de-identified for confidentiality and patient privacy.

Total Comments: 6

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