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Specialty:

Pediatrics

Secondary Specialty:

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Board Certifications:

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Education:

MD, Semmelweis Medical University Budapest, Hungary

Residency:

Bellevue Hospital Center
New York, NY

Fellowships:

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Affiliations:

UPMC Shadyside
UPMC Presbyterian
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC

Languages:

Hungarian
Spanish

Paul Szabolcs, MD

Doctor

Chief, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapies
Professor, Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

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Biography

Research Interests

  • Understanding the biology of immune reconstitution and acquisition of tolerance after cord blood and bone marrow transplantation
  • Bone marrow transplantation to induce tolerance to solid organ transplant grafts
  • Cellular therapy strategies to prevent or treat viral infections and leukemia relapse after cord blood and HSCT transplantation
  • Primary Immune Deficiency syndromes with a focus on minimally intensive transplant strategies for those with advanced co-morbidities
  • Crohn’s disease and other autoimmune diseases
  • Innovative therapies for Krabbe disease

View Dr. Szabolcs' full list of publications at PubMed.

View Dr. Szabolcs' Pitt Department of Immunology web page.

Biography Summary

Dr. Paul Szabolcs trained at Semmelweis University School of Medicine in Budapest. He completed his residency at Bellevue Hospital/NYU Medical Center and was Chief Fellow at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. He completed postdoctoral fellowships at Memorial Sloan Kettering in Molecular Biology and at Rockefeller University in Physiology and Cellular Immunology. He has been Chief of the BMTCT division at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh since 2011.

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