Sunder Sims-Lucas, PhD

Sunder Sims-Lucas, PhD
Researcher

Assistant Professor, Clinical Translational Science, Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Assistant Professor, Department of Developmental Biology, Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Education

Graduate School: PhD, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Research Interests

  • Renal Stroma Derived Endothelial Precursors are Critical for Renal Development
  • The renal microvasculature is highly sensitive to hyperglycemia
  • The renal endothelium and diabetes
  • Affect of Aging on Urothelial Function
  • University of Pittsburgh as the GUDMAP Tissue Hub and Collection Site
  • The renal microvasculature is highly sensitive to hyperglycemia
  • Anatomical annotation of the human GU tract throughout gestation
  • Kidney Development and disease
  • Lung formation and disease
  • Vascular Development
  • Lymphatic Development
  • Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and vasculature
  • Blood flow
  • Hypoxia and oxygen concentration
  • Diabetes and structural kidney disease

View Dr. Sims-Lucas' full list of publications from PubMed.

Biography Summary

Sunder Sims-Lucas, PhD, received his doctorate degree at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He trained as a post-doctoral fellow at Ohio State University and the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Division of Pediatric Nephrology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC.

Dr. Sims-Lucas’ research program interrogates the role of blood flow, oxygenation and endothelial progenitors in patterning developmental organs with a particular focus on the kidney and lung during development and disease.

Formation of the vasculature is a critical developmental process that requires tightly regulated cellular and molecular processes. The developing kidney is a very vascular organ that receives approximately 20% of the total cardiac output. The peritubular capillaries surround the nephron tubules and play a critical role in reabsorption and electrolyte balance. Little is known about the various origins of the peritubular capillary network and the role of the peritubular capillaries in normal development and also during disease processes. His laboratory identified an endothelial progenitor in the kidney that is critical for kidney development and also limiting postnatal injury. Dr. Sims-Lucas’ robust program also interrogates the role of oxygenation and blood flow in patterning the formation of the kidney and during acute kidney injury. His research is funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health as well as grants from the Diabetes Complications Consortium and by the Vascular Medicine Institute.